Cross-Cut


By Moira McMahon Leeper Hunter Lee Hughes is a big name for a blonde wisp of a boy growing up in Texas and Michigan, alternatively being passed from parent to parent via silver 747s traversing the great American sky. Those hours of travel afforded a lot of time to dream. And so, dream he did. … I met my friend Hunter in San Antonio, Texas, while attending a small, specific kind of liberal arts school where we were both getting a...

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By: Collin Kelley I discovered the poet Sara Teasdale on August 4, 2026 after the nuclear war had devastated Earth and most of its people had fled to Mars. That’s not true of course. It was actually the summer of 1979. I was 10 and enthralled by the science fiction writing of Ray Bradbury. I was almost finished with The Martian Chronicles, his 1950 collection of connected stories about man’s attempt to colonize Mars. In one of...

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Cross-Cut: Harold Monro

Cross-Cut: Harold Monro


Posted By on Apr 28, 2016

By Allyson Mackender Harold Monro (1879-1932) was born in Brussels and did not settle down for most of his life. As he moved around the European continent, through Ireland and England, Monro was characterized as a “moody young man who brooded over himself, and not liking what he found, imagined that he would discover something better under another sky” (Monro vii). Insecurities inherent to human nature and anxieties regarding monotony...

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By Dave Jarecki Working at an independent bookstore during a quarter-life crisis shortly after 9/11 was as good a part-time job as any I might want. Every employee carried around some grudge against their version of “The Man,” from the former radical/general manager, to the community organizing assistant manager, to all the wanna-be-writers—a group to which I belonged—who slung pages back and forth, griped about rejections, and...

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By J. Raymond It’s not quite eight o’clock in the morning as I write these words upon a barf bag, thirty-something thousand feet up in the sky. Heading home (West Palm Beach) from my most recent book reading and signing in Boston. I drink a can of bloody Mary mix with two vodkas, reflecting on the events of the weekend. It was a success, I’d say. The room was full, books were purchased, alcohol was consumed, relationships consummated...

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By Megan Reynolds Although Bertolt Brecht is widely known for his playwriting and theoretical contributions, his skill as a poet cannot be overlooked or undercut simply because of his talents in other forms of writing. Historical events unfolding at the time of his writing, namely World War II, greatly influenced Brecht and his perceptions of humanity as a whole. Periods of exile punctuate Brecht’s poetry, directing the way he not...

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