Cross-Cut


By Megan Reynolds Although Bertolt Brecht is widely known for his playwriting and theoretical contributions, his skill as a poet cannot be overlooked or undercut simply because of his talents in other forms of writing. Historical events unfolding at the time of his writing, namely World War II, greatly influenced Brecht and his perceptions of humanity as a whole. Periods of exile punctuate Brecht’s poetry, directing the way he not...

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Cross-Cut: William Blake

Cross-Cut: William Blake


Posted By on Feb 28, 2016

By James J. Pulizzi Should we travel to London hoping to pay homage to William Blake’s (1757 – 1827) grave—as we might for Newton, Keats, Wordsworth, or Tennyson—we’ll find a spartan headstone that indicates only his bones lie nearby. Bunhill Fields where Blake was buried in 1827 closed as a cemetery in 1854 when its four acres were already filled with the bodies of over 120,000 dissenters and nonconformists. Nazi bombing...

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By Stephen S. Mills It seems fitting that the first time I met poet Steven Reigns we were in a seedy gay club (and motel) that has been a fixture of the Orlando gay community for forty years. I was living in Orlando at the time and spent many of my nights in that very space, but on this one I was there to meet up with Reigns, who was just passing through. When you first meet Reigns, it’s hard not to notice his piercing blue eyes....

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by Hunter Lee Hughes Imagine an impassioned young man born of a devout family practicing a religion deemed barbaric and false. His equally misunderstood, pious “bro” friends recruit him to do something about the intolerance and injustice of it all. First, they break the rules and simply continue to practice their faith in private, smuggling religious tokens into the country. When even these quiet acts are met with...

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